Gograha filmmaking workshop extends deadline to August 15 for its 2021/22 intake

The workshop was established in 2019 to help new-coming filmmakers develop their voice through “conscious” stories drawn from their personal experiences. 

NL Today

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Gograha, a year-round mentorship-cum-grant program for beginning and up-and-coming filmmakers, has extended the deadline for its 2021/22 intake to August 15. 

The workshop was established in 2019 to help new-coming filmmakers develop their voice through “conscious” stories drawn from their personal experiences. 

The workshop is a year-long program with three phases. According to the Gograha team, the eight-weeks long first phase will be on script writing while the second phase will be on direction and will run for 12 weeks. The third phase will be a six-weeks long ‘Residential Retreat’. 

The first phase of the workshop will begin on 4 September while the second phase will run through January and March. The dates for the third phase of the workshop haven’t yet been finalized. 

The lead instructor for the workshop of 2021/22 will be acclaimed film director Deepak Rauniyar who is also a faculty member for the Department of Film Studies at University of North Carolina Wilmington, USA. The workshop will also have filmmakers from around the world as resource persons. 

Only 12 persons will be selected for the workshop and the three outstanding scripts by the end of it will receive help to secure financing and production support. The participants will be expected to turn in their final scripts by April 2022 out of which three outstanding scripts will be announced a month later in May.

The three winners of the Gograha Filmmaking Workshop 2020/21 were Shanta Nepali’s ‘Muna’, Jyotsana Singh Thakuri’s ‘Alexia’, and Sunil Gurung’s ‘Wind Horse’. Each project had won a grant worth five lakhs rupees. The grantees are expected to complete their film projects by the end of 2021.

The workshop intends to teach participants different aspects of narrative filmmaking (especially for short films) and film appreciation, among others, while immersing them in a mutual learning environment.  One would need access to a computer, an internet connection, and a mobile phone with a video camera to attend the workshop.

According to the team, the workshop aims to “actualize” diverse stories of Nepali society into films by embracing the sensibilities and worldviews they offer.

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